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Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb infrared radiation produced by the sun and trap heat in the atmosphere. There are six types of greenhouse gases: water vapor (H20), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous... Read More

Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb infrared radiation produced by the sun and trap heat in the atmosphere. There are six types of greenhouse gases: water vapor (H20), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ozone (O3), and fluorinated gases. The main sources of human-caused GHG emissions are combustion of fossil fuels, agricultural and industrial practices, and decay of organic waste. While GHG emissions are a global issue, local governments can have a direct impact on the sources within their jurisdiction.

This indicator documents community-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Data is supplied by communities and is based on calculations performed in accordance with a community-wide GHG protocol.

Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee

This greenhouse gas emissions inventory was completed in 2016, using 2012 data, as part of the City of Memphis' commitment to the Global Covenant of Mayors. The inventory was completed according to the standards of the Global Protocol for Community-scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GPC).This is the first greenhouse gas emissions... Read More

This greenhouse gas emissions inventory was completed in 2016, using 2012 data, as part of the City of Memphis' commitment to the Global Covenant of Mayors. The inventory was completed according to the standards of the Global Protocol for Community-scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GPC).

This is the first greenhouse gas emissions inventory completed for the city. It is important to note that these figures apply to community-wide emissions within City of Memphis boundaries and do not include emissions for all of Shelby County.

Supporting documentation: indicator7_cdp-cities-2016-information-request-city-of-memphis.pdf (161.63 KB)